Projects Seeking Patient Partners: Patient-Centered Research for Standards of Outcomes in Diagnostic Tests (PROD) Study

A wide variety of tests are used in healthcare, and often give important information to help patients and their healthcare providers make decisions about their care. The PROD study is a project based at the University of Washington that aims to improve our ability to assess both the good, as well as the possibly harmful effects of diagnostic tests. We want to create new guidelines by understanding the outcomes (such as emotional or physical demands) of diagnostic tests that are most important to patients. New guidelines will help health care providers, researchers, and people who produce tests know what information they need to gather or share in order to give patients a better say in their healthcare. Our research is focusing on diagnostic imaging tests. These include common tests like X-rays, ultrasound, CT scans, and MRI scans.
The PROD study is looking for patients who have had at least one diagnostic imaging test, such as an MRI, CT (Cat) scan, Ultrasound, or X-ray. This test could have been done to screen for a disease, or to help make a diagnosis, but preferably requested or organized by your primary care physician. Patients who share their experience as an advisor to the study can help PROD researchers make our research better. The patient stakeholder can help by telling researchers what is important for them to consider when we are interviewing other patients in this study or when the researchers are trying to understand the information they have collected. PROD researchers also want to know how to share this information with patients in the future.

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Author: CERTAIN Patient Advisory Network

The CERTAIN Patient Advisory Network seeks to improve research by providing a way for patients to work in collaboration with researchers throughout the research process — from the identification of research questions to the communication of the results.

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